Milk Street: The New Rules: Recipes That Will Change the Way You Cook

Milk Street: The New Rules: Recipes That Will Change the Way You Cook


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JAMES BEARD AWARD FINALIST — Become the best cook you know with this playbook of new flavors, new recipes, and new techniques: Milk Street’s New Rules, with 200 game-changing recipes driven by simple but transformative insights into cooking.

This revelatory new book from James Beard Award-winning author Christopher Kimball defines 75 new rules of cooking that will dramatically simplify your time in the kitchen and improve your results. These powerful principles appear in more than 200 recipes that teach you how to make your food more delicious and interesting, like:

  • Charred Broccoli with Japanese-Style Toasted Sesame Sauce (Rule No. 9: Beat Bitterness by Charring)
  • Lentils with Swiss Chard and Pomegranate Molasses (Rule No. 18: Don’t Let Neutral Ingredients Stand Alone)
  • Bucatini Pasta with Cherry Tomatoes and Fresh Sage (Rule No. 23: Get Bigger Flavor from Supermarket Tomatoes)
  • Soft-Cooked Eggs with Coconut, Tomatoes, and Spinach (Rule No. 39: Steam, Don’t Boil, Your Eggs)
  • Pan-Seared Salmon with Red Chili-Walnut Sauce (Rule No. 44: Stick with Single-Sided Searing)
  • Curry-Coconut Pot Roast (Rule No. 67: Use Less Liquid for More Flavor)

You’ll also learn how to:

  • Tenderize tough greens quickly
  • Create creamy textures without using dairy
  • Incorporate yogurt into baked goods
  • Trade time-consuming marinades for quick, bright finishing sauces, and more

The New Rules are simpler techniques, fresher flavors, and trustworthy recipes that just work–a book full of lessons that will make you a better cook.


From the Publisher

new rules, chris kimball, milk streetnew rules, chris kimball, milk street

new rules, chris kimball, milk streetnew rules, chris kimball, milk street

You can be the best cook you know by following a handful of “new rules” in the kitchen. Use herbs as greens, not garnish. Stop stirring your polenta. Super-starch your pasta. Use less liquid for more flavor.

These simple, transformational principles will change the way you cook, whether it’s Pasta with Sweet Corn, Tomatoes and Basil or Pan-Seared Salmon with Red Chili-Walnut Sauce or a Vietnamese Chicken Salad. With over 190 recipes and 75 New Rules for how to cook, your cooking will go from good to great. It will also be easier – less time and less prep – since the big, bold flavors of this new approach to cooking requires less time and technique to develop.

new rules, chris kimball, milk street

new rules, chris kimball, milk street

new rules, chris kimball, milk street

new rules, chris kimball, milk street

new rules, chris kimball, milk street

new rules, chris kimball, milk street

No. 4: For Dressing That Sticks, Salt Your Vegetables

Slick and watery vegetables can be hard to flavor; dressings and seasonings slide right off. Salting them first draws out moisture, leaving behind firmer, drier vegetables to which seasonings can stick

No. 13: Stop Stirring Your Polenta

For the creamiest, easiest polenta, all you need is an oven, a couple vigorous stirs and no endless whisking.

No. 29: Super-Starch Your Pasta

Create silkier, thicker sauces by cooking pasta and noodles in less water than typically called for, concentrating the starches that leach out of the noodles and into the cooking water.

new rules, chris kimball, milk street

new rules, chris kimball, milk street

new rules, chris kimball, milk street

new rules, chris kimball, milk street

new rules, chris kimball, milk street

new rules, chris kimball, milk street

No. 39: Steam, Don’t Boil, Your Eggs

Safeguard soft- or hard-cooked eggs against rubbery whites and overdone yolks by steaming instead of boiling. Steam transfers less energy to the eggs, cooking them more gently.

No. 49: Flat Birds Cook Faster, Crisp Better

Spatchcocking puts the breasts and thighs on an even plane so they cook at the same time. Flattening the bird also exposes all of the skin to heat, resulting in crisper skin.

No. 72: Stop Searing Your Meat

Skip the searing. It’s easier to build flavor into a stew by adding handfuls of herbs and plenty of robust spices. You’ll save the time and hassle.

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